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Politics of science

Politics of science  

  By: Jason E. Barkeloo on May 24, 2018, 2:04 p.m.

Should scientists also be politicians?

314 Action was founded by members of the STEM community, grassroots supporters and political activists who believe in science. We are committed to electing more STEM candidates to office, advocating for evidence-based policy solutions to issues like climate change, and fighting the Trump administration's attacks on science.

http://www.314action.org/mission-1/

Jason E. Barkeloo
Chairman & Founder, Open Therapeutics


  Last edited by:  Jason E. Barkeloo  on June 10, 2018, 5:20 p.m., edited 1 time in total.

Re: Politics of science  

  By: Jason E. Barkeloo on June 8, 2018, 4:49 p.m.

She studied Mexico City. Can she lead it, too?

Summary Until 3 years ago, Claudia Sheinbaum Pardo worked quietly as an environmental engineer at the National Autonomous University of Mexico in Mexico City. Now, with a 20-point lead in the polls, she seems set to become mayor of this city of nearly 9 million people in elections on 1 July. Her work on energy science and engineering—with a focus on vehicle emissions and climate change mitigation—is respected both in Mexico and abroad, and she's a member of the Mexican Academy of Sciences and a former member of the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Many say she's uniquely positioned to understand and tackle the myriad problems that afflict the 20 million people in the city's metropolitan area, especially its stuffed-to-the-gills public transportation, epic traffic snarls, and worsening water crisis. Meanwhile, critics worry about Sheinbaum Pardo's close ties with Andrés Manuel López Obrador, a leftist populist and the leading candidate in Mexico's presidential election.

http://science.sciencemag.org/content/360/6393/1052

Jason E. Barkeloo
Chairman & Founder, Open Therapeutics

Re: Politics of science  

  By: Jason E. Barkeloo on June 8, 2018, 5:03 p.m.

No bias found in NIH reviews

An investigator's race or gender didn't appear to influence the judgments of reviewers in an unusual experiment that altered the names on real National Institutes of Health (NIH) research grant proposals.

An investigator's race or gender didn't appear to influence the judgments of reviewers in an unusual experiment that altered the names on real National Institutes of Health (NIH) research grant proposals. Researchers substituted common names of white men, black men, white women, and black women for the actual investigators' names in 48 proposals. When 412 scientists reviewed the proposals, they gave similar scores to all four test groups. But the results don't rule out bias during the NIH grantmaking process, the researchers say. The NIH-funded study is part of an ongoing effort to check for bias in the agency's peer-review process after a troubling 2011 study found that black applicants are less likely to win NIH funding than whites.

http://science.sciencemag.org/content/360/6393/1055

Jason E. Barkeloo
Chairman & Founder, Open Therapeutics

Re: Politics of science  

  By: Jason E. Barkeloo on June 9, 2018, 6:18 p.m.

In the Trump Administration, Science Is Unwelcome. So Is Advice. As the president prepares for nuclear talks, he lacks a close adviser with nuclear expertise. It’s one example of a marginalization of science in shaping federal policy.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/09/climate/trump-administration-science.html

Jason E. Barkeloo
Chairman & Founder, Open Therapeutics